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e-Connections: July 2013
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President's Message

Dear colleagues and friends,

For over thirty years, the mission of TIAW is to advance economic empowerment for women. By ‘economic empowerment’, we mean that a woman is able to succeed and advance economically as well as freely make her own economic decisions. However, women don’t start out in life as women, nor are they empowered in any way in many countries whether by cultural or political constraints. It all begins with a girl.

According to AGALI (Adolescent Girls’ Advocacy and Leadership Initiative), which has brought together over 100 leaders and organizations working to transform the lives of adolescent girls in Africa and Latin America, there are six critical factors that contribute to adolescent girls’ economic empowerment*:

  • Financial capital (e.g., cash, savings, access to credit, and other financial assets)
  • Human capital (e.g., education, health, self-esteem, and communication skills)
  • Social capital (e.g., social networks, friends, mentors, and supportive family members)
  • Physical capital (e.g., ID card, household goods, land, housing, and transport)
  • Social norms (e.g., early marriage, childbearing, influence of age, gender, and ethnicity)
  • Institutions (e.g., political and legal rights, market structure, and the education system

TIAW’s Daughters Program focuses on the promotion of economic empowerment for girls aged 14-24. Our initial work is around financial literacy education. We are looking for partners to add employment training and life skills training.

While there simply is not enough work being done to maximize the effect the empowering girls can have on our world, there are many organizations lending extraordinary effort. A personal favorite of mine is the Nike Foundation, whose work I have followed for many years. I urge you to go to www.girleffect.org and watch the video Nike has created. It will revolutionize your thinking about the power of a girl.

Nike tells us all why we cannot wait to help our girls**

1. GIRLS ARE AGENTS OF CHANGE

They play a crucial role in solving the most persistent development problems facing the world today. By investing in their economic potential through education and by delaying child marriage and teen pregnancy, issues such as HIV and AIDS can be resolved and the cycle of poverty can be broken. To learn how a girl's success is the world's success, watch the girl effect films above.

2. PEOPLE ASSUME GIRLS ARE BEING REACHED

They're not. The reality is that children's programmes focus on 0-5 year-olds, youth programmes tend to focus on males and older groups, and women's programmes don't typically capture adolescent girls. Programmes that do reach girls rarely address the ones most at risk. To break the cycle of intergenerational poverty, programmes must be designed for, and measure the impact on, girls.

3. THE COST OF EXCLUDING GIRLS IS HIGH

In India, adolescent pregnancy results in nearly $10 billion in lost potential income. In Uganda, 85 per cent of girls leave school early, resulting in $10 billion in lost potential earnings. By delaying child marriage and early birth for one million girls, Bangladesh could potentially add $69 billion to the national income over these girls' lifetimes.

With the permission of the Nike Foundation, TIAW is in the process of posting several of their excellent resources on www.tiaw.org

In the meantime, I urge you to take a look at their excellent research directly:

The girl effect fact sheet

7 things you need to know about girls

Why investing in girls is important

We must all engage to support the economic empowerment of the girl in our communities around the world. Start by joining our Daughters Committee, daughters@tiaw.org.

It’s the kind of change that lasts forever.

LKHSignature.bmp

Lisa Kaiser Hickey

President

*as published on www.agaliprogram.org

**as published on www.girleffect.org courtesy of Nike Foundation

 


Educated Women Create a Ripple Effect

by Phyllis Reardon, M. Ed

"Education is not preparing for Life; education it is Life.”  --  John Dewey

Education is life and for women the more economic empowered they are the better their life; the better the life of their children and the economy in which they live. One of the goals of The International Alliance for Women, TIAW is the economic empowerment of women throughout the world.

How is this economic empowerment achieved?

Education is key to the successful economic empowerment of women. Through both formal and informal educational programs women achieve the skills, knowledge and understandings that permit them to grow personally. This personal empowerment is the biases for economic empowerment.

Research shows that when women are educated there is a far reaching ripple effect that extends beyond the mind of that woman. Through her new found educated enhanced self she becomes a strong confident powerful woman. The ripples spread to her immediate family to positively impact her children both in health and knowledge. With this new powerful educated self she will influence her community and the economic development of her local region.

Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach him to fish and he will eat for a life time.’ Proverb

‘Educate a woman and she will change the world.’ Phyllis Reardon

As an educator for over twenty-five years it never failed to amaze me that the young women who sat in front of me tended for the most part to set their educational achievements and economic goals lower than their males counterparts. It became for me as a teacher a focus of attention and question.

How can you help produce a ripple?

I invite you to check the TIAW website to explore the educational programs they offer and discover how you can get involved.

 


What can replace education, the key to success?

 by Sefakor Grateful-Miranda Komabu-Pomeyie

It is very interesting to know that disability is among the global dialogue on development under the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN-DESA). They promised to hold the sixth session of the convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in New York between 17th to 19th July. Did you check if it was held? According to the UN-DESA News, this year’s focus is on "the ways to ensure adequate standard of living and empowerment through inclusive social protection and poverty reduction strategies: disability-inclusive development in national, regional and international processes, and community-based rehabilitation and habilitation for inclusive society.”

This sounds very captivating and promising to any individual who reads this session's goals. The question is, if all these goals can be attained if the people with disabilities do not have both formal and informal education. As Nelson Mandela once said "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world”. Do people with disabilities have full access to this most powerful weapon? Would they also be able to change the world? I hope you would follow the discussions and add your voice for a better access and inclusive education.



Malala Day

On 12 July 2013, Malala Yousafzai addressed the United Nations Youth Assembly in New York. The date marked her 16th birthday and was recognized internationally as Malala Day. Over 500 youth leaders were represented that day from countries worldwide. Malala was introduced by U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon of South Korea. This was her first high-level appearance after the assassination attempt by Taliban gunmen while returning home on a school bus on 9 October 2012.

U.N. Special Envoy for Global Education, Gordon Brown, helped organize the event and launch the petition in Malala’s name demanding that all children worldwide be able to attend school by the end of 2015.

In her speech she proclaimed that "Malala Day is not my day. Today is the day of every woman, every boy and ever girl that have raised their voice for their rights.”

You can watch the entire United Nations address here.

She closed her poignant speech by stating, "One child, one teacher, one book and one pen can change the world. Education is the only solution. Education first.”

Malala along with the help of others has established a fund to focus on helping girls go to school and raise their voices for the right to education. The Malala Fund launches in Fall of 2013. Visit www.malalafund.org for more information.




Thank you for reading our July issue of e-Connections, if you enjoyed it - please share it with your network by using the social sharing buttons above. If you are not a subscriber, please subscribe today. 

Are you interested in submitting an article for inclusion in one of our upcoming issues or becoming a contributing editor? If so, please contact admin@tiaw.org for more information.



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About Us

Who are We?

The International Alliance for Women is organized as a 501(c)3 foundation in the USA. We are a global community of economically empowered women across all continents that welcome you to our members’ cities and countries, connecting you with their networks of business and community professionals.

What's our Purpose?

The International Alliance for Women connects leading women’s organizations worldwide to leverage their reach and resources, creating a global community of economically empowered women.

Through our Global Programs we seek to make a difference in the world for those women who are not empowered economically.